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Chavez gets broad powers to remake Venezuala - Journal of Omnifarious

Jan. 31st, 2007

10:37 am - Chavez gets broad powers to remake Venezuala

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Here is the article: Chavez gets powers to remake Venezuela

I've thought Chavez was an interesting character in the past, and my general feeling about him was positive. But this really makes me nervous. I feel that very few good things come from centralized power. It is better at obstructing and destroying than making new.

While I understand (from hearsay evidence, so I might well be wrong) that Central and South America have a big problem with a small group of people controlling most of the wealth, and it being impossible for someone who isn't already part of the wealthy group to become part of it. In other words, those parts of the world have a closed class system supported by family ties. This requires some sort of intervention to correct. Repeated violent revolts have seemed to be ineffective in dislodging the system.

But I'm not sure that creating a giant block of centralized power who's goal is to undo it will work. Chavez will have to be remarkably honest and enlightened. Perhaps he is all that, but history would generally say that people in such positions are not actually up to the job.

Current Mood: [mood icon] worried

Comments:

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From:geothermal
Date:January 31st, 2007 08:08 pm (UTC)
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>>>but history would generally say that people in such positions are not actually up to the job.>>>

You might be interested in reading any book about the CIA in South and Central America. I suggest something in the 1970-1985 era. The CIA has torn down many good leaders who were up to the job of improving their countries. However, some leaders are better at cozying up to American companies and doing so, means the CIA backs off. I'm sure the CIA did good things in the cold war, but in South and Central America and in the middle east, it seems they just want to destabilize areas so American companies can profit. The main exception is Costa Rica, but CR is very open to American tourists dollars, so the CIA stays away. Anyway, the library has a few good books on the CIA to peruse the issue.

Jonathan
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From:omnifarious
Date:January 31st, 2007 08:23 pm (UTC)
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Yeah, I know this is true too. One thing that has previously impressed me about Mr. Chavez is the fact that he's realized this is what's likely to happen and has worked to change his country to make it much less likely for the CIA to succeed in mucking things up.

Many things are done by our government in secret that really should see the light of day. *sigh*

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From:ex_butterfl246
Date:January 31st, 2007 09:26 pm (UTC)

2 cents, slightly OT

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impossible for someone who isn't already part of the wealthy group to become part of it

While it's true that there is a strongly established class system in Central America, it is not impossible to move upward. For some reason, being educated as an engineer (that includes architects) is one of the careers that can elevate a person man into the upper class, especially if paired with a good marriage and other connections. (Other careers would be medicine and law.)

At least, that is the case in El Salvador.
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